Kōrero: Whanganui places

Roadside Stories: Whanganui River

For the Māori tribes of the Whanganui River, the river was vitally important for transport, food and spiritual wellbeing. Māori caught eels by building ingenious eel weirs in the river – but these structures were removed by European settlers to allow access for steamboats. Boat trips up the river became popular with tourists in the late 19th century.

Listen to a Roadside Story about the Whanganui River. Roadside Stories is a series of audio guides to places around New Zealand.

Te whakamahi i tēnei tūemi

YouTube: Manatu Taonga's channel

This item has been provided for private study purposes (such as school projects, family and local history research) and any published reproduction (print or electronic) may infringe copyright law. It is the responsibility of the user of any material to obtain clearance from the copyright holder.

Archival audio sourced from Radio New Zealand Sound Archives. Sound files may not be reused without permission from Radio New Zealand Sound Archives (Reference number TCDR5112).

Ngā whakaahua me ngā rauemi katoa o tēnei kōrero

Te tuhi tohutoro mō tēnei whārangi:

Diana Beaglehole, 'Whanganui places - River settlements', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/mi/interactive/35273/roadside-stories-whanganui-river (accessed 18 November 2019)

He kōrero nā Diana Beaglehole, updated 15 Jun 2015