Kōrero: Diseases of sheep, cattle and deer

The loneliness of the quarantined cow

The loneliness of the quarantined cow

Isolation is a key aspect of quarantine procedures to prevent the spread of disease. This lone cow was on Matiu/Somes Island, in Wellington Harbour, in 1970. The island housed one of the main Department of Agriculture quarantine stations from 1889 until 1995. Its early role was to quarantine immigrants when there was an outbreak of smallpox or scarlet fever on board ship. During both world wars, enemy aliens or people thought to be security risks to New Zealand were isolated there. Today the island is predator-free, and the public can visit to see native plants and wildlife.

Te whakamahi i tēnei tūemi

Alexander Turnbull Library, Dominion Post Collection (PAColl-7327)
Reference: EP/1970/5206/18a

Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand, Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa, must be obtained before any re-use of this image.

Ngā whakaahua me ngā rauemi katoa o tēnei kōrero

Te tuhi tohutoro mō tēnei whārangi:

Gary Clark, Neville Grace and Ken Drew, 'Diseases of sheep, cattle and deer - The threat of disease in New Zealand', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/mi/photograph/17417/the-loneliness-of-the-quarantined-cow (accessed 22 November 2019)

He kōrero nā Gary Clark, Neville Grace and Ken Drew, i tāngia i te 24 Nov 2008