New Zealand’s smaller albatrosses

Mollymawks The Thalassarche albatrosses, sometimes known as mollymawks, are considerably smaller than the great albatrosses. Of the world’s nine species, only two do not breed in New Zealand.

Part of story: Albatrosses

Albatrosses

Albatrosses have long been held in awe by mariners, who call them masters of the oceans. These birds seem to glide effortlessly into the teeth of a gale, over heaving seas.

Part of story: Albatrosses

Life history

The characteristic features of albatrosses’ life history include delayed age of maturity and low reproductive rate. Albatrosses are long-lived seabirds.

Part of story: Albatrosses

Albatrosses

Albatrosses are the largest of the seabirds. They are most frequently seen in the oceans of the southern hemisphere south of about 30° latitude, and in the northern hemisphere in the north Pacific Ocean.

Part of story: Albatrosses

Snares, Antipodes and Bounty islands

The Snares The closest subantarctic islands to New Zealand, about 100 km south of Stewart Island, the Snares consist of two groups:

Part of story: Subantarctic islands

Fauna

Insects

Part of story: Subantarctic islands

Case histories

Mahoenui giant wētā Wētā are insects unique to New Zealand. Related to crickets and grasshoppers, they have remained relatively unchanged over millions of years. There are around 100

Part of story: Threatened species

Foraging and migration

Foraging while breeding

Part of story: Seabirds – overview

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