Story: Māori feasts and ceremonial eating – hākari

Hākari at Te Whai-a-te-Motu meeting house

Hākari at Te Whai-a-te-Motu meeting house

This hākari (feast) was held around 1932 at Mataatua , Ruatāhuna, to celebrate the opening of Te Whai-a-te-Motu meeting house after restoration. Te Whai-a-te-Motu means the chase of the island. It was built for the prophet and resistance leader Te Kooti and commemorates his exploits in escaping from government forces. The feast is laid out outside to accommodate the huge crowd.

Using this item

Alexander Turnbull Library, Sister Annie Henry Collection (PAColl-6098)
Reference: 1/2-030892-F

Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand, Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa, must be obtained before any re-use of this image.

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How to cite this page:

Basil Keane, 'Māori feasts and ceremonial eating – hākari - Traditional feasts', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/photograph/40553/hakari-at-te-whai-a-te-motu-meeting-house (accessed 19 October 2021)

Story by Basil Keane, published 5 Sep 2013