Story: Ngā take Māori – government policy and Māori

George Clarke, first protector of aborigines

George Clarke, first protector of aborigines

The missionary George Clarke and his wife Martha are shown seated in the centre of this photo, surrounded by their 13 children, in about 1868. The couple and their first son, also named George, had arrived in New Zealand in 1824. In 1840 Clarke took the post of first protector of aborigines (Māori). George junior worked for his father as one of several sub-protectors from 1842 until 1846, when the protectorate was abolished by a new governor, George Grey.

Using this item

Alexander Turnbull Library, Nga Kupu Korero Collection (PAColl-6081)
Reference: PAColl-6081-1

Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand, Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa, must be obtained before any re-use of this image.

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How to cite this page:

Mark Derby, 'Ngā take Māori – government policy and Māori - A new colony, 1840s to 1850s', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/photograph/34375/george-clarke-first-protector-of-aborigines (accessed 14 December 2019)

Story by Mark Derby, published 20 Jun 2012