Story: Marutūahu tribes

Page 6. Facts and figures

All images & media in this story

Iwi (tribal) identification

In the New Zealand censuses since 1991, residents of Māori descent were asked to indicate the tribe to which they were affiliated. The figures below show the number who indicated the Marutūahu tribes (including those who indicated more than one tribe), and the regions where they were found in the greatest numbers in 2013.

The only previous census asking Māori to indicate tribal affiliation – but not of multiple tribes – was that of 1901.

Ngāti Maru

  • 1901 census: 1,350
  • 1991 census: 384
  • 2001 census: 2,604
  • 2006 census: 3,375
  • 2013 census: 3,768

Major regional locations

  • Auckland: 1,230
  • Waikato: 1,185

Ngāti Pāoa

  • 1991 census: 1,695
  • 2001 census: 2,397
  • 2006 census: 3,375
  • 2013 census: 3,456

Major regional locations

  • Auckland: 1,440
  • Waikato: 966

Ngāti Tamaterā

  • 1991 census: 903
  • 2001 census: 1,866
  • 2006 census: 2,460
  • 2013 census: 2,577

Major regional locations

  • Waikato: 1,152
  • Auckland: 618

Ngāti Whanaunga

  • 1991 census: 177
  • 2001 census: 399
  • 2006 census: 588
  • 2013 census: 624

Major regional locations

  • Auckland: 294
  • Waikato: 177

Treaty settlements

In 2016 the Marutūāhu Iwi Collective, covering the tribes of Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Paoa, Ngāti Tamaterā, Ngāti Whanaunga and Te Patukirikiri, was preparing to settle its historic treaty claims. The total financial redress envisaged was valued at $30 million, including the transfer to iwi ownership of Maramarua Crown Forest land.

The Marutūāhu tribes will also share in wider collective treaty settlements that were under negotiation in 2016. The Hauraki Iwi Collective and Ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau Collective Redress Deeds both acknowledge the treaty claims of these tribes.

How to cite this page:

Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal, 'Marutūahu tribes - Facts and figures', Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/marutuahu-tribes/page-6 (accessed 19 December 2018)

Story by Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal, published 8 Feb 2005, updated 22 Mar 2017