Te Tai – Treaty Settlement Stories

Contents

Ngati Porou: Te ture Pakeha

In this webisode, we look at the confiscation of Ngati Porou lands by the Crown. We also look at how Ngati Porou has used the law to fight for the return of their rights and lands.

Key themes in this webisode:

Land confiscation

When the New Zealand Land Wars broke out in the 1860s, many iwi had their lands confiscated by the Crown. But by the end of the wars, Ngati Porou still held its lands. So the government turned to creating laws that would enable it to take their lands legally. Thousands of acres were confiscated in a short time under different acts of legislation passed by the Crown. Ngati Porou has since used the law to return the legal rights, titles and agreements over Maunga Hikurangi, Waiapu River, forestry and fisheries to the iwi.

The haka ‘Kiringutu’

One of Ngati Porou’s chiefs, Tuta Nihoniho, composed the haka ‘Kiringutu’ to express his anger and frustration at the Crown’s actions to confiscate Ngati Porou lands.

Maunga Hikurangi

One of the things that Ngati Porou ensured was included in their Treaty settlement deed was ownership and mana over Hikurangi and other lands and waters in the Ngati Porou region. Now the iwi is keen to ensure they fufil their role as kaitiaki (guardians and caretakers) of their lands and waters.

Focus questions

Below are some questions to consider before watching webisode four. Once you have watched it, come back to these questions.

1. What do you already know about the confiscation of Maori land by the Crown?

Theme: Mana Motuhake

Do a group brainstorm with your classmates to record what you already know about the confiscation of Maori land. Do you know other places in New Zealand where iwi are fighting to have their land returned to them?

2. In this webisode you will hear the words ‘Na te pene nga mana whenua o Ngati Porou i raupatu’ (‘Ngati Porou authority over their lands was removed by the pen’). What do you think this means?

Themes: Mana MotuhakeKaitiakitanga

What is a pen used for? How can a pen be used to remove someone’s authority? Have you heard the phrase ‘The pen is mightier than the sword’? What do you think this phrase means?

3. Do you know the haka ‘Kiringutu’ by Tuta Nihoniho?

Theme: Turangawaewae

What are the words of this haka? What is it about? Where has it been performed?

Quick-fire questions

Watch webisode four then answer these questions.

Activities

Open Google Docs to record your answers Link to Google Docs

Activities for everyone

1. During and after the New Zealand Land Wars of the 1860s, the New Zealand government created new laws and systems to confiscate land from Ngati Porou and other iwi.

Here are some examples:

  • Native Lands Acts 1862 and 1865
  • Public Works Act 1864
  • Native Land Court
  • Maori Land Court
  • New Zealand Native Land Settlement Company
  • East Coast Maori Trust
  • Native Townships Act
  • Tairawhiti Maori Land Council
  • Native Trustee
  • Maori Trustee.

Choose one or a number of these examples to research. Explore how these laws and systems helped the Crown confiscate Ngati Porou land.

Here are some questions to help guide your research:

  • What was this law or system set up to do? What was its purpose?
  • Is the law or system still in existence? If not, when did it change?
  • How did this act or system impact Ngati Porou?
  • How did this act or system impact other iwi?
  • How would this have impacted whanau?

Here are some links to help you with your research:

Activities if your kura is in Ngati Porou or you are from Ngati Porou

1. Research the haka ‘Kiringutu’. Explore its meaning and why it was composed.

Theme: Mana Motuhake

Here are some questions to help guide your research:

  • Who composed the haka?
  • Why did he compose this haka?
  • Why do you think the composer chose to express his thoughts in a haka?

Here are some links to help with your research:

You could present your findings as:

  • a written report or magazine article with images
  • an oral presentation with a performance of the haka to your class
  • a work of art e.g. illustration or painting
  • a short video clip.

2. Compose your own waiata or haka about the confiscation of Ngati Porou land.

Think about the message you would like to come through in your waiata or haka. Your waiata could be an expression of how you feel about land being taken by the Crown. Or it could be a celebration of the return of Ngati Porou land to the iwi.

Present your waiata or haka to the class as an oral presentation. You could include a performance of your waiata and an explanation of its meaning and your thoughts behind it.

Themes: Mana MotuhakeTurangawaewae

Activities if your kura is outside of Ngati Porou or you are from another iwi

1. Choose a Maori waiata or haka that has been composed about whenua (land). It could be a waiata or haka from your own iwi. Explore its meaning and why it was composed.

Theme: Mana Motuhake

Here are some questions to help guide your research:

  • Who composed the waiata or haka?
  • When was it composed?
  • Why was it composed?
  • Why do you think the composer chose to express their thoughts in this way?
  • What is your understanding of the message in the waiata or haka?
  • Who are the people in your whanau or community that can help you with your research?

You could present your findings as:

  • a written report or magazine article with images
  • an oral presentation with a performance of the waiata or haka to your class
  • a short video clip.

2. Compose your own waiata or haka about the confiscation of Maori land.

You could write it about whenua from your own iwi that was taken by the Crown, or you could choose another example. Think about the message you would like to come through in your waiata or haka. Your waiata could be an expression of how you feel about land being taken by the Crown. Or it could be a celebration of the return of land to iwi.

You could include a performance of your waiata and an explanation of its meaning and your thoughts behind it.

Themes: Mana MotuhakeTurangawaewae

For the kaiako

Links to Te Marautanga o Aotearoa

Nga Toi: Toi Ataata, Taumata 5 – Ka tuhura, ka whakawhanake, ka whai mohiotanga, ka whaka maramatanga:

  • ki te whakawhanake i nga aria me nga matapuna o te kaitoi;
  • ki nga tuahua whakaawe.

Tikanga a-Iwi: Te Whakaritenga Papori me te Ahurea, Taumata 5, (5.2) Ka whakamarama i nga huarahi i whakawhanaketia ai, i puritia ai, i urutautia ai, te tuakiri ahurea me te tuakiri a-motu.

Introducing the topic

  • Show some images of Hikurangi, Waiapu, and other areas around Ngati Porou.
  • Ask the akonga if they recognise these places.
  • Ask the akonga what these places mean to them.
  • Who do they think holds the mana and authority over these places? Why?

Considerations

  • What do akonga already know about the confiscation of Maori land?
  • What do they know about laws set up by the Crown to aid in the confiscation of Maori land?
  • What do they know about the confiscation of land in Ngati Porou?

Glossary

raupatu(hia)
confiscate, conquer (muru)

rawa
resource, property, asset (kame)

whakataunga
settlement (whakaritenga, whakatatu)

 

Ngati Porou have chosen not to use macrons in this resource.

© Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou 2020.