Te Tai – Treaty Settlement Stories

Contents

Ngati Porou: He aha kei roto?

In this first webisode we look at the Ngati Porou Treaty Settlement Claims Bill and the rangatira who signed the Treaty of Waitangi on behalf of the iwi in 1840.

Key themes in this webisode:

The historical account for the Ngati Porou Treaty settlement

The historical account sets out the grounding principles for the Crown apology, cultural redress (te whakatikanga-a-ahurea) and financial redress (te whakatikanga-a-putea, a-rawa) included in the settlement. Cultural redress includes non-monetary remedies that support the mana of Ngati Porou within the region of Ngati Porou. Financial redress includes monetary remedies paid out to Ngati Porou for wrongs inflicted upon the iwi by the Crown over many years.

The Ngati Porou Treaty Settlement Claims Bill

Members of Parliament that spoke at the third reading of the Ngati Porou Treaty Settlement Claims Bill included the late Ikaroa Rawhiti MP Parekura Horomia. We see the then Education Minister and National MP Hekia Parata. We also see the then Minister of Maori Affairs Pita Sharples read the Crown apology to Ngati Porou in Parliament.

The significance of lions 

In the opening sequence of this part we see lions at the Wellington Cenotaph near Parliament grounds. We see them again at the end at the Gisborne Cenotaph. The lion represents the British Empire, of which New Zealand was a part as a commonwealth country and colony. The lion symbolises courage and is the national animal of England.

Focus questions

Below are some questions to consider before watching webisode one. Once you have watched it, come back to these questions. You may want to change your answers or add to them.

What do you already know about the Treaty of Waitangi?

Do a group brainstorm with your classmates to record what you already know about the Treaty.

1. What is ‘rangatiratanga’?

Theme: Mana Motuhake

What words can you see in the word ‘rangatiratanga’? e.g. rangatira, tira, rata. What do these words mean? Do these words help you understand the meaning of the word ‘rangatiratanga’?

2. How many marae do you think there are in Ngati Porou?

Theme: Turangawaewae

Write your answers down on a piece of paper or on the whiteboard before you watch the webisode. Then revisit your answer after you have watched it to see how close you were.

3. How many people are there in Ngati Porou?

Theme: Whakapapa

Write your answers down on a piece of paper or on the whiteboard before you watch the webisode. Then revisit your answer after you have watched it.

Quick-fire questions

Watch webisode one then answer these questions.

Map of marae in Ngati Porou

Themes: Mana MotuhakeTurangawaewae

 

 

 

Activities

Open Google Docs to record your answers Link to Google Docs

Activities for everyone

In New Zealand Parliament is the lawmaker of the land. New laws begin as documents called bills. Bills are drafts of proposed new laws.

1. Research how a bill (like the Ngati Porou Treaty Settlement Claims Bill) becomes law in New Zealand.

Theme: Mana Motuhake

Here are some questions to help guide your research:

  • Whose role is it to make new laws in New Zealand?
  • What is a bill?
  • What stages does a bill go through to become law?

Present your findings:

  • by doing an oral presentation to your class
  • as a flow diagram to show the steps for how a bill becomes law in New Zealand
  • as a visual poster
  • as a written report with images (e.g. photos or illustrations)
  • as a short video tutorial for your peers.

Here are some links to help you with your research:

2. What is a Crown apology? Discuss and research this question with a classmate, in a small group, or with your class.

Theme: Mana Motuhake

Here are some questions to help guide your research:

  • What or who is the Crown?
  • What is an apology? What should an apology include? How should it sound? What is the Ngati Porou word for ‘apology’?
  • When was the last time you apologised for something? What was it for? How did you apologise?
  • Think of a time when someone apologised to you for something. What was it for? How did they apologise? How did you respond?
  • What is the significance of a Crown apology?

Here are some links to help with your research:

Activities if your kura is in Ngati Porou or you are from Ngati Porou

1. Look at the map of the marae in Ngati Porou. Write your responses to the following questions and then discuss them with a classmate.

Themes: TurangawaewaeWhanaungatangaWhakapapa

  • Which marae do your whanau connect to?
  • Who else in your class connects to the same marae as you?
  • How many marae on the map have you been to?
  • What occasions or events did you visit those marae for?

2. Choose a marae from the map above to research. It could be a marae that you whakapapa to, or another marae that you just want to learn more about.

Themes: TurangawaewaeWhanaungatangaWhakapapa

Here are some questions to help guide your research:

  • What is the name of the tipuna whare?
  • What are the names of the iwi and hapu of the marae?
  • What are the names of the different whare at the marae?
  • Why did you choose this marae to research?
  • Who are the people in your whanau or community who can help you gather information about the marae you have chosen?
  • Who are the tipuna of this marae?
  • What is the history of the marae?

You could present your findings as:

  • a written report or magazine article with images
  • an oral presentation to your class
  • a work of art e.g. illustration or painting
  • a short video clip.

Activities if your kura is outside of Ngati Porou or you are from another iwi

1. Choose a marae in New Zealand to research. It could be a marae that you whakapapa to, or a marae close to where you live.

Themes: TurangawaewaeWhanaungatangaWhakapapa

Here are some questions to help guide your research:

  • What is the name of the tipuna whare?
  • What are the names of the iwi and hapu of the marae?
  • What are the names of the different whare at the marae?
  • Why did you choose this marae to research?
  • Who are the people in your whanau or community who can help you gather information about the marae you have chosen?
  • Who are the tipuna of this marae?
  • What is the history of the marae?

You could present your report as:

  • a written report or magazine article with images
  • an oral presentation to your class
  • a work of art e.g. illustration or painting
  • a short video clip.

2. In this webisode we see lions at the Wellington Cenotaph near Parliament grounds and at the Gisborne Cenotaph. The lion represents the British Empire and symbolises courage.

  • What kind of creature, taniwha or animal would you choose to symbolise your iwi, hapu, whanau, or kura? Why?
  • Does your iwi, hapu, whanau, or kura already have a kaitiaki?
  • Create an image of your kaitiaki. You can choose a real kaitiaki or create one.
  • Write a description of your kaitiaki including its characteristics, appearance, etc.
  • Explain why you have chosen to illustrate this animal, taniwha or creature as the kaitiaki for your iwi, hapu, whanau or kura.
  • What is the story of your kaitiaki?
  • Where can your kaitiaki be seen? How would you choose to show your kaitiaki? Where would you like it to be seen?

For the kaiako

Links to Te Marautanga o Aotearoa

Tikanga a-Iwi: Te Wahi me te Taiao, Taumata 4, (4.2) Ka whakamarama i nga whaiwahitanga me nga matataki o te torotoro mo te tangata, te wahi me te taiao.

Tikanga a-Iwi: Te Whakaritenga Papori me te Ahurea, Taumata 5, (5.1) Ka whakamarama i te whakaritenga o nga punaha kawanatanga, me te whakawaenga o enei i te ahua noho a te tangata.

Introducing the topic

Check out these links to information and resources about the Treaty of Waitangi and the Treaty settlement process:

Considerations

  • What do akonga already know about the Treaty of Waitangi?
  • What do they know about the Treaty settlement process?
  • What do they know about Ngati Porou and their Treaty settlement story?
  • What do they want to know or find out about Ngati Porou?

Glossary

haumanu
restore

mangai
representative, speaker (kanohi,  kaiwhakarite)

rangatiratanga
chieftainship, right to exercise authority, chiefly autonomy, chiefly authority, ownership, kingdom, realm, sovereignty, principality, self-determination, self-management (te tu mana motuhake [o tetahi iwi], me tana ahei ki te whakahaere i a ia ano, i runga i ana ake tikanga)

tamoko
to sign (waitohu, tohu)

whakapaaha
apology

whakataunga
settlement (whakaritenga, whakatatu)

whakatikanga a-ahurea
cultural redress

whakatikanga a-putea, a-rawa
financial redress

 

Ngati Porou have chosen not to use macrons in this resource.

© Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou 2020.